Monthly Archives

December 2011

JOBY Winter Photo Contest 2011

By | Contests, Photography | One Comment

Here are the beautiful photos for our Winter Photo Contest 2011! We had so many great submissions and are so impressed! Thanks to everyone who entered!

And the winners of a JOBY GorillaPod Focus and a Lowepro DLSR Fastpack are …

… Teresa Reid

Teresa Pope Reid

and Craig Holquist of Penn Wood’s Photography

Penn's Woods Photography

And now for the rest of the amazing entries!

Andrius Repsys

Anna Caitlin Lackey

Aurora Lampson

 

Ben Podolak

 

Bryan Rau

 

Diego Luison

 

Elise Marks

 

Ernestas Erna

 

Felix Pks

 

Fred Benz

 

Gage Salyards

 

Gus Jockers

 

Ivan Handler

 

Jack Bell

 

Jeremy Sky Crawford

 

John Mccoy

 

Jurgita Maceviciute-Malakauskiene

 

Martynas Dainius

 

Mary Ellen Catindig

 

Matt Baker-White

 

Mihai Miroiu

 

Mike Barbee

 

Olena Taylor

 

Ramune Ber

Richard Johanns

 

Ryan Wakat

 

Sakari Sipila

 

Silvia Cheung

 

Simon Gaudet Binet

 

Travis Fisher

Yashaswi Manjunath N

 

Aren’t you impressed! We’ll be back with more great photo contests in the new year!

Tips from a Pro: Sports Photography Secrets

By | Friends of Joby, Photography | One Comment

Robert Beck is a staff photographer for Sports Illustrated magazine. For over 20 years, he has been behind the lens shooting sporting events all over the world. From golf to baseball, surfing to skiing, Robert captures athletes in action. He shared his secrets to great sports photography with us yesterday in a webinar hosted by our friends at Lowepro.  

©Robert Beck http://www.robertbeckphotography.com

Robert’s Gear for Sports Photography
Musts
-DSLR Body – He uses a Nikon D3s
-70 – 200 mm lens with f2.8 aperture
-Lens hood to protect his lens (instead of a filter)
-UDMA CF Cards in the fastest available speed, 4 GB – 8 GB

Nice to have
-200 – 400 mm lens, f4
-24 – 70 mm lens, f2.8
-16 mm fisheye lens
-Flash

©Robert Beck http://www.robertbeckphotography.com

 Which Camera Settings to Use

1. JPEG and RAW – Shoot camera RAW to capture the most information and have the most flexibility in post-production
2. Autofocus ON – You can change how fast your camera acquires the autofocus info. Set the speed of autofocus to correspond with the sport your shooting. Primarily uses the center dot as the focus pointHas the back button set up so he can focus first and then shoot a general area without the camera re-focusing
3. Vibration reduction software OFF
4. Auto white balance ON. Auto white balance is pretty good on new DSLRs Outdoors set it to “cloudy” to add warmth. Indoors match the light type. in the arena
5. Exposure mode MANUAL.  Robert shoots completely manual to have the most flexibility. Underexposed is better than overexposed
6. ISO as low as possible for the lighting conditions. For example, if it is sunny use 100 ISO, cloudy use 400 ISO.  The higher the ISO, the more noise (pixilation) will occur

©Robert Beck http://www.robertbeckphotography.com

What Makes Sports Shots Good?

 Every published photo is one out of 100s or 1000s of photos taken. This is where practice comes in. The more you shoot, the higher percentage of the photos you take will be good ones. Bottom line: if you want to become a better photographer – SHOOT! SHOOT! SHOOT!

©Robert Beck http://www.robertbeckphotography.com

Backgrounds are the most important thing to pay attention when you’re shooting sports. Find a background that is the least distracting possible to bring your subject out. You want it to be obvious to the viewer what the subject is.

©Robert Beck http://www.robertbeckphotography.com

Light – pay attention to the lighting conditions and work them to your advantage.

-The golden hour when the sun is low in the sky (early morning or late afternoon) is a great time.
-If you’re shooting in the middle of the day, put your subject against a darker background.
-Keep shooting even if its cloudy, rainy, snowy – let the action speak for itself!
-Play the light – Good front light is also good backlight. Try and get both perspectives.

©Robert Beck http://www.robertbeckphotography.com

Aperture – Set it to F2.8 or F4 for a shallow depth of field. This makes the background drop out dramatically so the viewer focuses on the subject

Composition – shoot a mixture of tight and loose shots. When in doubt, shoot looser. You can always crop-in during post-production.

Shutter speed – 1/1000th of a second is the slowest speed if you’re shooting action sports.

©Robert Beck http://www.robertbeckphotography.com

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If you’re interested in viewing Robert Beck’s work, please visit his website. If you’d like to be in the loop for Lowepro’s next webinar, follow them on Facebook.